15.10.13

The Source Family / Escape From Tomorrow / Mike Kelley @ PS1

---What I've been absorbing as of late...---

The Source Family
This documentary, directed by Maria Demopoulos & Jodi Wille, is the realization of Isis Aquarian, whose role within the Source Family was one of a historian.  Nearly all the material was hers to share, and many interviews were conducted with previous members of the family. During their happiest years the family lived out an old mansion called the mother house, while many members worked at the Source restaurant - the first for local foods in Los Angeles.   Jim Baker - who later became father Yod - started this family for the purpose of sharing love and facilitating a healthy lifestyle for it's members. My favorite aspect of the documentary was it's seemingly non biased opinion of the entire experience.  It easily expressed the desires and motivations for joining the family, while later on revealing the pains that come when theories about love and spirituality come into practice.  This film ultimately pointed to the complexities of human relations, while making it clear that simple ideas around lifestyle can sometimes be the most complicated to achieve. 

Escape From Tomorrow

Escape From Tomorrow is the debut film directed by Randy Moore and acts as a semi horror semi psychological thriller about a family and their trip to DisneyWorld. The special part about this film is that nearly the entire film takes place at the Disney Parks and is filmed there, however Moore never received permission from Disney at all.  I sort of refuse to believe that Disney is unaware of the existence of this film, so I keep trying to think of reasons why they haven't tried to sue Moore yet. Either way, the film is strange and full of bizarre moments that leave you cringing and laughing hysterically. Ultimately the film ends the way Disney would prefer - with the lead's dream coming true.  

 MIKE KELLEY @ PS1













There will never be enough words to describe the quantity of content in this exhibition. The show was incredibly well curated with plenty of space to let works mold each space into their own necessary channels.  Day Is Done, a seminal video by the artist, could be found in a giant dome in front of the museum.  I regret that I didn't have 12 hours to spend watching the variety of amazing videos in this entire exhibition.  Kelley is an artist whose work absorbs and becomes the dark places inside of ourselves, touching on many themes, like gender issues & general perversion while using humor as a means of making all of it easier to swallow. It's difficult to have any thing but admiration and fascination for an artist like Kelley. While I'm pleased to see such a large breadth of his work in person, I'm still saddened to know it's without him. 


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